Joint Injections

A joint injection is an injection of a steroid or other medication into a joint to help reduce inflammation or swelling, which can in turn reduce the pain associated with that specific joint.

While our first course of action here at the Institute for Functional Health is to design a functional health and chiropractic treatment, we also believe that there is a time and place to consider joint injections for the temporary relief of pain at a specific site.

Why Visit Us For This Treatment?

Traditional medicine's use of steroidal or anti-inflammatory injections have proven highly effective at treating acute pain that may be a result of traumatic injury such as an auto accident or sports injury.

As with any medication, there are side effects from the injections, most commonly temporary pain at the site of the injection.  If the injection contains a steroid, there are also complications that can arise with introducing a steroid into your body, such as weight gain, increase in blood sugar levels, water retention, and suppression of your body's own production of cortizone.

In keeping with our speciality of functional medicine, we instead utilize lidocaine as an alternative medication to steroids.  This is a more effective alternative because lidocaine does not effect blood sugar levels, or suppress liver or kidney function.  Under the supervision of Dr. Khym Zarzuela, D.O., our team is very experienced with incorporating these injections into a targeting treatment plan to permanently relieve the pain.  The combination of these minimally invasive therapies and natural therapy ensures safe and effective treatment without a reliance on an endless cycle of pain medications.

This type of pain management therapy is covered by many health insurance providers.  When you call the office to schedule your appointment, we can check on your insurance coverage as well. Schedule your initial consultation today so we can help you to determine if joint injections are an appropriate treatment for your current situation.

How long does the joint injection take?

Will the joint injection hurt?

What should I expect after the joint injection?

How long does the effect of the medication last?

How many injections do I need to have?

Who should not have a joint injection?